Should have, would have, could have-these thoughts have crossed many a classic trucker's mind over the years. Lots of us have for one reason or another missed opportunities to start or sometimes finish a project that we wish we did.

Jerry Chatterton is a good example. As an 18-year-old, Jerry owned a rather rough old '63 C-10 that he had high hopes for. Unfortunately, hopes were all he had as the cash to bankroll the project was pretty much nonexistent at the time. Looking reality in the face he ended up selling the truck while promising himself that someday he'd pick up where he left off and really build the classic pickup of his dreams.

Fast-forward to just a few years ago-in his travels Jerry spied the remains of a '60 C-10 sitting atop two other Chevy truck hulks at a local boneyard. He stopped in and rescued the '60 (cab and chassis) from its certain demise and thus rekindled his original dream of building a hot rod pickup. After dragging the C-10 home, he and his best pal Curtis began by stripping the pickup down to its bare frame. At that point Jerry enlisted his dad (an old-school hot rodder) whose experience would be of great help during the course of the build. The trio trucked the pile of parts to the blaster for stripping and once the bare parts were back home in the garage they began work on the frame.

The first order of business was to graft a Camaro clip to the front of the C-10's frame. They also equipped the chassis with a complete air ride setup and a rearend pirated from a '63 Impala.

While the frame and components were at the powdercoater work began on the engine. Jerry built a 505hp, 383-cube SBC to power the pickup and dressed the mighty mouse motor in a plethora of brightwork. He then backed the engine with a Muncie four-speed and slid the combo into place in the freshly completed chassis.

The bodywork ended up being quite a task. Though the cab and chassis were of 1960 vintage Jerry still had his heart set on replicating the '63 he'd had as a youngster. With this in mind he replaced the front sheetmetal, grille, and bumper with '63 items and found a replacement bed up in Oregon. With all the body components gathered he then enlisted the aid of Sierra Auto Body to massage the body parts into shape and then spray the sheetmetal in multiple coats of PPG charcoal gray metallic, a few licks of some awesome flames and just the right amount of subtle graphic touches by Dave at Little Designs. With the meticulous metalwork and paint completed (and a ton of plating handled by AC Plating) Jerry hauled everything back home to the garage and began final assembly. With helping hands from Curtis, his dad, the kids, and his wife, Nancy, the gang carefully put the truck together piece by piece.

Assembly (as is often the case) was not all roses. Jerry ran into his fair share of setbacks. He and his dad had to fabricate a lot of components, and the wiring took a lot more time and effort than he'd planned on, but everything worked out in the end. Once they'd accomplished that task all that was left was to install the bed wood and strips, and to get the pickup into the upholstery shop for a fresh new cockpit. As you can see, Superior Upholstery did a fine job stitching lots of leather and the interior really tied everything together and ended up as the perfect finishing touch to Jerry's super C-10.

Well, it took a long time and a lot of work but Jerry's been enjoying every second behind the wheel. He's traveled to lots of shows and local gatherings since the pickup's been finished and he's extremely (and rightfully) proud of how it came out. This super C-10 is perfect proof that it's never too late to tackle a dream.