One has to admit that unlimited talent and "cubic dollars" are a really big help in realizing one's classic truck dream. Though most of us scrimp and save to build the nicest, coolest classic truck that we can, there are those who are lucky enough not to be restricted by limited funds. Now, don't get me wrong, there's no sour grape whining going on here-just a bit of classic truck envy on my part.

This awesome '72 GMC belongs to PGA golf pro Hunter Mahan (a local SoCal success story) who has spent years working diligently perfecting his impressive talent on the links. But golf isn't his only love-and just like us, Hunter's a motorhead. And since relocating from Orange County, California to Texas he struck up a friendship with Mike at DuSold DeSigns-a gentleman and company, which sports every bit as much talent in the custom automotive/truck field as Hunter has on the golf course. Hanging out at DuSold became a pleasant pastime for Hunter and it wasn't long before he spied this slammed, but obviously neglected GMC in one of the storage buildings on the shop grounds. The pickup's potential wasn't lost on Hunter and shortly after running across it he decided that it deserved a bit of attention and a chance to hit the blacktop once again.

After striking a deal with Mike and spending a bit of time brainstorming the GMC's future mods, the pair closed the deal and the DuSold crew went to work transforming the previously neglected workhorse into the awesome classic truck you see here.

As is the norm, the project started with a complete teardown followed by a total rebuild and customization job on the truck's foundation. The original frame was stripped, fully boxed, and outfitted with custom bridged crossmembers. DuSold then added a custom Art Morrison four-bar setup to which a fresh 9-inch Ford rearend was hung. Up front, the original GM IFS was rebuilt, and a pair of dropped spindles and muscular Wilwood disc brakes added (a pair of equally massive Wilwood binders were added to the 9-inch out back, as was a pair of Ridetech airbags by the way). With the chassis complete, the next step was to get it off the jackstands and onto the ground. To this end, a quartet of Forgiato Concavo wheels (20s and 22s) wrapped in low-profile Nitto rubber were bolted on and those jack stands kicked to the side.

Next up was a bit of motorvation. The pickup's evil, wicked, mean, and nasty design deserved a drivetrain of equal appeal, so Hunter chose a tried-and-true SBC as a basis for the build. The engine was completely rebuilt and outfitted with the best in go-fast goodies-including but not restricted to a forged crank, Pink rods, Brodix aluminum heads, JE pistons, a lumpy performance cam, a Vintage Air front runner serpentine setup, and a wicked looking old-school Hilborn setup sporting modern electronic injection technology. The muscular mouse was then treated to a healthy helping of detailing, dressing, paint, and nickel plating, as well as an equally muscular Phoenix performance overdrive transmission.

With the chassis and driveline handled, it was at last time to address the visuals. The GMC body was masterfully massaged back into pristine shape and then treated to a slew of custom touches that when combined set the pickup above and beyond the scope of a professional restoration. DuSold set to work giving the cab and bed a close shave including all the truck's badges and emblems, the door handles, and the driprails. The side marker and taillights were removed and their holes filled, a pair of exhaust outlets cut into the bedsides (and cool escutcheons fabricated), and a pair of hand-fabricated taillights installed. While they were at it the DuSold artisans worked their magic on the inner bed panels and interior sheetmetal, as well.

Speaking of the interior, as soon as the metalwork was complete, and a smooth-as-glass coating of jet black PPG urethane and awesome contrasting copper/gold graphics were added, they enlisted the talents of Village Upholstery to cover the cab's custom seats with a slew of supple leather and matching cut-pile carpeting.

As you can plainly see, this ain't your typical GMC-it's a rolling piece of artwork that grabs ones attention to say the least. Hats off to Hunter and the craftsmen at DuSold DeSigns for a unique vision-one that's sure to give us low-buck builders something to aspire to as we toil away burning the midnight oil in our own garages.