With each and every day that passes, generations of classic truck owners continue to evolve like chapters in a book. While some have been there all along, new arrivals on the scene seem to show up daily, adding to the excitement with fresh concepts and ideas as well as utilizing proven old formulas. For Nick Greene of Randolph, Massachusetts, it was a steady stream of car shows and model building under the guidance of his dad, Ira, that led him directly into the world of custom cars and trucks. Recalling the early days, Nick has fond memories of cruising into local events riding shotgun in his dad's '65 Ford police cruiser while being awestruck with the fabrication and paint on numerous hot rods and customs lining the event grounds. As the years passed, the youngster began to hone his own personal skills, becoming an accomplished bodyman and painter in his own right.

Nick's first efforts in the truck world came in the form of a lowered '83 Chevy S-10 and a radical '97 Isuzu Hombre pickup that was channeled hard, bagged, packed with loads of custom fabrication-including suicide doors-and glazed with a wild candy spray-job. While he was having a blast with the Hombre, he still felt there was something missing in the mix. Nick had always admired the classic lines of early-'60s Ford pickups, and he finally decided it was time to bid mini-trucking goodbye and open a new chapter that would concentrate solely on vintage steel. Putting the word out on the street that he was in the market for a classic Ford, it wasn't long before he was approached at a local cruise night with an offer he couldn't refuse. He was turned onto a solid '63 Ford that was all original and ran great for a short amount of cash. After a test run, the deal was done, and it was time to get serious and start rethinking the future of his new project.

Having gained experience over the years with his mini-trucks, Nick decided to start from the ground up. Tearing the truck completely apart, he figured the only way to get the look he wanted was to begin with an updated chassis. Starting with plenty of fresh steel stock, he teamed up with good friends John Lewis and Jon Sniger to design a spine that would not only slam the truck onto the pavement, but would also make it handle well when going down the road.

Beginning up front, they added a Fatman Fabrications independent frontend combined with Mustang II rack-and-pinion steering, Firestone 'bags, and Chevrolet disc brakes to be sure there would be plenty of whoa in the mix. Out back, a stout Ford 9-inch rear with factory drum brakes was set into place, perfectly matched up with a custom fab'd triangulated four-link suspension, while Firestone 'bags and Napa shocks help smooth out the ride. Rollers had to look bitchin' and came in the form of old-school steelies from Wheel Vintiques shod with wide whites by Firestone.

Wanting to keep the truck's vintage feel very much alive, Nick passed on a crate-anything and opted instead to freshen up the factory 292-cubic-inch workhorse that Ford initially installed back in '63. Now resting on a set of custom raised motor mounts, the mighty V-8 got a fresh squirt of gloss, was set into place with new exhaust and spark by PerTronix, and was mated to its original three-speed standard transmission, keeping the whole family together and ready for action on the street.

Focusing on the body with a keen eye, Nick ironed it smooth, gave it a mild shave, and installed a little flush-cycle gas cap in addition to one of his signature canted and frenched license plates to the back of the bed. He also fab'd up a neat set of wheel tubs to allow the truck to get as low as possible once the bags are purged of air, not to mention a cool side exhaust port. Nick then coated it all in RM Matte Black to give it plenty of evil depth for famed artist Keith Hanson to lay down just enough red and gray accents and pinstriped flames to make it all come together. Inside, the cab was treated to a custom dash filled with stock gauges by Jon Sniger, while Henry Garcia of Platinum Custom Interiors in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, got the nod to stitch up a decadent lipstick red business office that would add plenty of wow into the mix.

Nick wanted to be sure to thank his very patient and supportive wife Dawnmarie for understanding all those late-night thrash sessions in the shop. Looking at the finished truck resting on its 'rails, all we can say is wicked! We hear Nick is now working on a killer little Model A Ford sedan that might be the perfect complement to his hot hauler.