Envy. There are many kinds of envy-good, bad, frivolous, and just plain jealousy. Luckily, Judy Enloe turned her little bit of harmless envy into motivation. It all started because her husband, Don, has acquired quite a stable of street rods and custom cars over the years that are all finished to a high level of quality as per his vision for each one. Judy didn't mind for a long time, and was never jealous of the cars in the traditional way that a spouse gets jealous about more time being spent with the car than...well, we all know how that ends. Judy's jealousy stemmed more from wanting to have the same kind of fun that Don seemed to be having. She didn't want to just go along for the ride; she wanted her own work of art on wheels.

Don didn't put up too much of a fight on this one, and offered his support. Soon after, a '56 F-100 Custom Cab was found in Oklahoma. Judy liked the idea of cruising around town in the old truck, so a deal was made, and they brought the Effie back to Tennessee to form a game plan. Since they were both busy running their general contracting business, they employed John Cate of Moe & Curley's Hot Rod Shop in Knoxville, Tennessee, to whom the Enloes were now close to since Mr. Cate's shop has tackled many other projects for Don.

Simplicity in motion was decided for the quintessential classic truck. Judy didn't want anything too outlandish, so the goal was to have a clean and unique truck that would lay down many reliable miles for her. The F-100 couldn't have been a better truck to start with; it was already roadworthy, original, and complete.

The next five months would go by surprisingly easy. Once in Knoxville, Moe & Curley's got started on the chassis by discarding the I-beam suspension up front, and a Galaxy frame stub took its place, which used the stock passenger car parts, including the steering box. But they opted for the adaptation of late-model Ford truck disc brakes that would be controlled by a Master Power master cylinder. Air Ride ShockWaves now control the ride, allowing the front to be dumped in the weeds when parked, which leads to the Enloe's favorite thing about the big window-its stance. The rear was a fairly simple operation: Currie 9-inch with a three-O gear and their big drum brakes. A Total Cost Involved rear leaf-spring kit was called in to hang the stout 31-spline rearend under the polished Rock Valley stainless steel gas tank.

Shooting for reliability with a touch of fun, Moe & Curley's machined and built the 351 Ford Windsor. The engine went back together using almost all the stock specs, with the exception of an Edelbrock RV cam and high-rise intake matched with a 750-cfm Holley carb. On the outside of the mill, Street & Performance pulleys and drive system were used, along with their valve covers. Just below those are factory long-tube cast-iron exhaust manifolds that belch through a set of Flowmasters. We find more Galaxy pedigree in the '71 C6 transmission, which was also built and installed at the shop in Knoxville.

Now it was time for everyone's favorite-bodywork! Things weren't too out of whack for John Cate and crew, but with the decision to go black, things were going to have to be perfect. Amongst all the block-sanding, they decided to keep all the stock trim and badges with only the deletion of the hood emblem. This would also include retaining the stock bumpers, grille, door handles, and taillights. Advance Plating in Nashville, Tennessee, rechromed the bright work while the DuPont '72 Mustang GT black was being sprayed.

Judy now sits at the helm perched atop a late-model Ford bench seat that was covered in saddle-colored leather with matching door panels, console, and carpet. Power windows, a Lecarra wheel, ididit column, and FoMoCo gauges set in a Moon panel also surround her. We can't forget the Alpine stereo system that she bops her head to while hittin' the streets in style, while a Vintage Air unit keeps her cool on those muggy southern days. And back to that prized stance, adding to the end result is a tasteful choice of Colorado Custom wheels, 18x7s in the front and 20x8s in the rear, all shod in Yokahama rubber.